Saturday Doll-Making Workshop in March and April

Spots Still Available in Saturday Doll-Making Workshop Saturdays March 15 through April 5, May 10 and 17. Time: 9:30 am until 12:30 pm Fee: $100 for all materials and fees. Choice of skin color and hair colors available. Class size is limited and basic sewing skills required. Email heather@collispuro.net and return a $50...

Annual Fund Success!

Annual Fund Challenge Met!  $10,000 Gift Spurs Success Thanks to a wonderful response from the CAWS community, we met our challenge goal of 90% participation in this year’s annual fund! As a result, CAWS will receive an additional $10,000 gift from a generous, long-time donor. This strong level of support resulted in our raising more than $55,000 for the 2013-14 annual fund. These gifts came from many sources, including:  77 CAWS families  100 percent of our Board of Trustees 100 percent of our full-time faculty and staff Grandparents, alumni parents and friends A private foundation All who contributed were automatically entered into a drawing for two free tickets on Cape Air, compliments of Stella Wolf, Goldenstar Teacher (see winners, below!). We extend our deepest thanks to all who showed their support and found a way to contribute. The annual fund is the single greatest fundraising effort we undertake each year, and its success is crucial to the financial health of our school. With appreciation, Lori Etringer and the Development Committee   Fifth Grade Grandparents Win Cape Air Tickets Robert and Dolores Lowe of West Virginia were selected as the winners of our annual fund drawing for two free tickets on Cape Air. Tickets are good anywhere Cape Air flies, including the Virgin Islands, Puerto Rico, the Cape and the Islands, Maine and New York. “We are thrilled. We’re not used to winning anything,” Robert said. The Lowes made their gift to the annual fund because of their grandson, Samuel (grade 5). “We think Sam is getting a good education, and we want to support the institution that is providing...

Inside the Waldorf School of the Peninsula

The New York Times sparked national media coverage with it’s front page story on why Silicon Valley parents are turning to Waldorf education. This film picks up where that story left off. “Preparing for Life” takes viewers inside the Waldorf School of the Peninsula where the focus is on developing the capacities for creativity, resilience, innovative thinking, and social and emotional intelligence over rote learning. Entrepreneurs, Stanford researchers, investment bankers, and parents who run some of the largest hi-tech companies in the world, weigh-in on what children need to navigate the challenges of the 21st Century in order to find success, purpose, and joy in their...

See For Yourself Why Waldorf Education Works

  See For Yourself Why Waldorf Education Works On Saturday, October 19, from 10 a.m. to noon, families of students entering Pre-K through Grade Eight are invited to Cape Ann Waldorf School to learn more about Waldorf education.  Parents and children can speak with teachers, parents and students, and experience for themselves some of the activities that enliven a Waldorf classroom. Kelly Hiselman, the school’s admissions director, is organizing the open house. “At Cape Ann Waldorf School, and Waldorf schools all around the world, our goal is to ignite each child’s passion for learning,” Hiselman explained.  “We do this by focusing on how and when children develop, and tailoring the curriculum to the needs of the children in each grade level.  We also make sure the lessons are multi-sensory, and filled with opportunities for students to experience the material first hand.  In other schools children may read a story and write about it, and that’s it.  Our students may read and write about the same story, but they may also turn it into a play.  At many schools, music class is focused on listening to and appreciating music.  At our school, every student plays an instrument, so each of them can create their own music.  Through drama, movement, handwork and storytelling, we give our students continuous opportunities to directly experience what they are learning about.  This approach makes learning more fun, and more effective.  When you talk with our eighth graders, the results are impossible to miss—they love learning, they are self-aware and self-confident, they are creative, and they are completely engaged with the world around them.” Parents at the school agree. ...

A Grandmother’s Story about the Impact of Today’s Kindergarten on One Little Boy

reposted from the blog, “Defending the Early Years” A Grandmother’s Story about the Impact of Today’s Kindergarten on One Little Boy Posted on October 6, 2013   This piece was written by our colleague Blakely Bundy. Bundy is the Outgoing Executive Director of The Alliance for Early Childhood, based on the North Shore of Chicago. We share her story here as an illustration of what is happening in too many kindergarten classrooms across our country. A Grandmother’s Story about the Impact of Today’s Kindergarten on One Little Boy I wanted to relate my “tale of woe” about my grandson’s experience in kindergarten this fall.   I will call him William. I know that it’s a common story now, but this is a first for me on a personal level.  Aside from being William’s grandmother, I am a former teacher and have been involved as an early childhood professional in several different capacities for my entire career. Over the summer, my daughter and her family moved from Winnetka, IL, a progressive school district on the North Shore of Chicago, to a town on the East Coast. They chose that town after doing quite a bit of research on the schools and I even accompanied them and talked to teachers and administrators in three of the communities that they were considering.  We thought that the town they chose was the most similar to the school system they had just left. William, a third child with two older sisters, had had a happy, fulfilling experience at  Willow Wood Preschool in Winnetka ,  a half-day (afternoon), play-based, NAEYC accredited program (where I had actually taught for...