Working Outdoors

Monday saw the whole school working outside, helping to weed and improve the kindergarten playground.  This was part of the annual Michaelmas celebration.  Unfamiliar to many, Michaelmas was celebrated in England on September 29 and marked the end (and beginning) of the farmer’s year.  At Cape Ann Waldorf School, it’s a time to work on school projects, as well as use one’s muscles in the annual all-school tug-of-war.  ...

Oven Update

The school’s new oven is almost ready for baking.  The first step was making a sand dome of the proper proportions.  Yoko Yeaton, Daisy Nursery teacher, came out to help build the sand form.   The next step was checking the shape against our template.  Still needs a little more sand on the sides. A mixture of earth, sand and water was used to form the oven walls.  After the clay walls dried, the sand was dug out by 4th grade teacher Aria Nevin. Movement & Gym teacher Vanya Yoors lends a hand.  The wheelbarrow was full of sand before we were done.  Next steps — firing the oven to dry it, applying a layer of insulation, and putting a roof over the top.   (Top two photos by Anita Brewer...

A New Look in the Hallways

This summer, we were fortunate to have the talented Lena Fransioli and Kasia Mirowska paint our main hallway.  Here are some photos from the undertaking. Above: Kasia and Lena, hard at work. Below:  Their brushes had to keep moving to create the effects they wanted.   Kasia Mirowska, Jonathan Poore (hallway project mastermind, architect, and CAWS parent) and Lena Fransioli (also a parent of a CAWS alumna, Zoe Fransioli). Real shadows play with the painted shadows.  ...

Huffington Post Story on Waldorf Education

A great piece on one family’s journey to Waldorf education.  Originally published here. Knitting Is More Important Than Homework By MARA MENACHEM Two years ago on the front page of the New York Times Sunday Business section, an article ran entitled, “A Silicon Valley School That Doesn’t Compute” about the Waldorf School in Silicon Valley. I had already made the decision to enter my oldest son in a Waldorf school before the article came out, but I pathetically admit that this piece in the New York Times validated my intuition regarding a Waldorf education. Years ago when I was looking at preschools, I checked out a Waldorf School. At the time, despite my hippie pre-disposition, the environment seemed too “out there.” However, I trusted my intuition enough to send my kids to another somewhat alternative, small, liberal pre-school focusing on socialization, not academics. The kids were happy, as were we. My kids were little Huck Finns and I was comfortable as their pied piper as they explored their world, not competed in it. But when it came time for elementary school, going “alternative” seemed a little too “alternative.” Traditional private school didn’t do it for me as a kid. I went to private school and felt stifled. I wanted something different for my kids. In my mind, I saw my kids being raised with limitless imagination and access to never-ending creativity, even after pre-school. My perspective always seemed to be different from the majority. My intellectual buddies (although many sans kids) served as the great validators of my gut feelings regarding how I handled certain situations. Over time, I...