Frederick Tudor the Ice King: A Hike With the Fourth Grade

As part of the fourth grade’s local geography block we ventured out to learn about Frederick Tudor, who in the mid 1800s was nicknamed the “Ice King.” He became known for revolutionizing the ice selling industry. Prior to his endeavors, the average American would not even think of enjoying a glass of ice water.  Because of him and his persistence, ice from Wenham Lake was favored by people around the world, as far as Cuba and India and even by Queen Victoria herself. It was not an easy path for Frederick; there were many preliminary trips where his shipments arrived melted and resulted in financial loss. Frederick Tudor learned from such experiences and over time advanced the tools and methods used to both harvest and ship ice. Our hike began with the students working together to create a grid of 2-foot by 2-foot squares. We later referred to this grid when looking out on Wenham Lake and imagining how the ice was cut into a grid of the same size ice blocks. As we hiked towards the lake, navigating through many intersections and trails towards the JC Phillips Preserve, the Ice King’s story was shared in parts. The story was interspersed with many riddles told by the students. For example, if there are two fathers and two sons who went fishing, and each of them caught a fish, how is it possible that only three fish were caught? Don’t know? Ask a fourth grader—they will be happy to tell you! Near the lake we came upon a recently fallen tree that had been freshly sawed. Upon further investigation, it...

Why is Waldorf math education unique and powerful?

Waldorf education lays the foundation for each individual to experience the internalization of mathematical thinking.  Like all Waldorf curricula math lessons are carefully planned to meet the needs of the developing child. Math lessons are brought through many subjects and modalities, while mindfully educating and experiencing math through the hands, heart and head.  Waldorf math education involves movement, music, rhythm, art, form drawing, language, creativity, curiosity and wonder, creating a truly multi-sensory approach to mathematics. As a result, Waldorf students acquire a deep mathematical understanding that they carry throughout their lives. Below is a brief overview of how math progresses through the grades. Math Through the Grades The rhythm of the day, of nursery rhymes and poems, and the social considerations of how many friends need a place setting or a swing are all integral parts of the youngest child’s day in a Waldorf early childhood classroom. In first grade, students learn that numbers exist everywhere in the world, especially in nature. Through this holistic approach to learning math, the special significance of the number one is discovered (as in one universe, one human being) and students explore the numbers that are found within each being (each person has two eyes and two ears, four limbs, and so on). In this way, the mystery of numbers is introduced and is further explored through the grades. In first grade, the four math processes are taught simultaneously because they reinforce each other (multiplication is fast addition, division is fast subtraction) and while learning math facts we begin to develop a general number sense which is so important for subsequent work in...

Shaping the Future

Anna Scalera leads her sixth grade class through main lesson on geometry Thursday, February 9, 2012. Students worked through geometric exercises using straight edges and compasses and measuring intersections and arcs to draw regular pentagons and star...